Tyonek has operations in Alaska and in the continental United States.

Tyonek manufactures products that support our country’s defense systems.

Tyonek Construction Group provides a host of construction services in and outside of Alaska.

We are proud that 52% of our employees are US veterans.

Working to benefit its nearly 800 shareholders.

Tyonek forms bridges to success and succession.

Striving for corporate sustainability.

We Are Tyonek


The shareholders of Tyonek are a strong and thriving community of nearly 800 people. Only 130 live in the Village of Tyonek, but most live within 100 miles of Tyonek, located about 40 air miles south … [Read More...]

2015 Shareholder Picnic

2014 TNC Shareholder Picnic-3

Shareholder Picnic Anchorage - June 20th, Saturday, from 12-3pm at Sisterhood Park, 4879 Van Buren Street Tyonek - June 27th, Saturday, from 12-3pm at the Emil McCord Memorial Baseball … [Read More...]

In the News

TMGI Veterans

Tyonek Manufacturing Group, Inc. Veterans

TMGI Veterans Tyonek Manufacturing Group, Inc. is proud to support our working Veterans and recognize each individual to express our endless appreciation and gratitude for their sacrifice and … [Read More...]

Annual Meeting Recognition

Annual Meeting-1

132 Shareholders attended the Tyonek Annual Shareholders meeting in Anchorage. Emil Notti, Alaska Native leader was the guest speaker at the event. Don Standifer received recognition for 35 years of service on the TNC board and received the Shareholder of the Year award. Nial Matsuda was recognized as the Youth of the Year and  Seraphim “Slim” Stephan was recognized for over 50 years of service to the Tyonek community.

Also, for more photos and current event news, please check out and like the new Tyonek Native Corporation Facebook page.

Tyonek Harvests an Unlikely Bumper Crop

Tyonek Watermelon

This summer, in the little village of Tyonek, something big happened in the community garden: About 60 pounds of watermelons were raised from seed in two high-tunnel greenhouses.
What’s even more impressive is that the village has gone from very little gardening experience to growing watermelon, which is rare in Alaska, in only four seasons.

Nicole Swenson, conservation director of the Tyonek Tribal Conservation District, said the garden is a little different from a traditional community garden -- instead of everyone being assigned their own plot to maintain, everyone works together to care for the plants. There's lot of community involvement, especially with young people, who are engaged in every level of the gardening process, from growing seeds to harvesting produce.

Swenson said gardens in Tyonek, a small village of 200 on the west shore of Cook Inlet, used to be common. That knowledge didn’t get passed on to younger generations. By 2012, when the community garden was started, there were hardly any gardens left. She said residents asked the conservation district for the garden as a way to improve overall health and food security. The village isn't connected to the road system, so most residents fly in their groceries.

The garden's tunnels have been more than productive since they were built, growing everything from zucchini and tomatoes to pumpkins and corn. This year, they produced over 1,800 pounds of produce, according to Tyonek garden volunteer and longtime resident Gwen Chickalusion.
Swenson got some watermelon seeds from Fairbanks gardener Kurt Wold, who has experimented with growing watermelon for the last 10 years. Reached by phone Tuesday, Wold was astounded by the amount the village was able to grow.
“That's incredible,” he said of the 60 pounds Tyonek harvested.
Wold said he grew about half of that this year using seeds he cultivated himself. He said in some years watermelon does well in the high tunnels, especially if it's warm. Cool years can be a total bust.

University of Alaska Fairbanks horticulture professor Meriam Karlsson said watermelon is a challenging crop to grow in Alaska. It requires a warm, long growing season -- two things Alaska summers rarely have.
“It’s one of those crops that gardeners like to try," she said, "and sometimes they're successful and sometimes they're not.”
Chickalusion initially wasn't sure if the watermelon would make it. Having only started gardening in 2012, she wasn’t sure where to begin with the plants. So she did what most people would do: she Googled it.
She said the watermelons were cute at first -- only the size of a nickel. She wasn’t sure if they would grow beyond that.
But they did, each one weighing in at about 5 pounds when they were harvested. And they were delicious.
“They were sweet and juicy, just like the personal melons you get at the store,” she said.
She’s taken what she’s learned in the community garden and is trying it on her own. She's built her own high tunnel and is harvesting her own produce.

Chickalusion said it costs about a dollar a pound to ship over groceries -- and those fruits and vegetables often don’t make the trip very well.
“It's a lot better,” she said of the produce from the garden.
It’s even had an effect on her family. She said her son Tommy Allowan, 7, loves eating food from the garden. Recently, she went to make a pumpkin cake and cookies from canned pumpkin and she said her son scoffed at the idea. If it didn’t come from the dirt, how could it actually be a pumpkin, he wondered.
“That makes sense,” she said. “A pumpkin isn't supposed to come out of a can.”

To read the article and view additional pictures, click on this link: Tyonek Watermelon Crop